FREE AT LAST!

I know this isn’t going to reach all of my readers, but some of my long time followers are probably aware that my old Twitter account got permanently suspended last week. In the past month it had twice come under malicious mass-reporting attack; suspect is a cowardly, right-wing pro-Kremlin account (it poses as anti-Russian but its behavior gives it away). The fact is that when you have a certain amount of followers over so many years, you’re going to make a lot of enemies, and Twitter is extremely vulnerable to malicious activity. Honestly I’m surprised the troll factory had left me alone as long as it did.

Evading a Twitter ban for someone like me is laughably easy, given that Twitter is arguably one of the dumbest tech companies in existence. But unlike the last time I caught a 1-week temporary ban, I haven’t yet created an alternate account (at least one that I actually use). That decision is deliberate, as well, because as much as I hate to get personal on the internet, I must admit- getting banned from Twitter was the best thing that could possibly happen to me right now. 

How can I describe the feeling? I think this nails it:

shawshank

To give you an idea of how much more I accomplished when I didn’t have Hellsite distracting me, let me give you one simple example. When I was off the site for that week, I went back to this screenplay I’d been writing before I took time off from that, mostly to write a book pitch. I’d had about six pages, roughly three short scenes. I’d been meaning to get back to it after I submitted the aforementioned pitch, but I just never got around to it. Without Twitter, I end up adding another 20 pages to it, including the most crucial scenes of the first act. They unblock my account, and I got distracted again. The very next day after that, I got to page 65 and it’s in the third act. Going by the rule of thumb of one page equals roughly one minute of screen time, that’s over halfway through a feature-length film, soon to be my first completed work.

And of course that’s not all. I’ve had time to continue learning about graphic design, video production, and editing, and managed to release my longest video yet, the first using green screen effects (I realize this seems mundane to people versed in editing, but I’ve only just started studying this, totally on my own). For years I’d had this Youtube channel and done virtually nothing with it, even after things like free time and lack of a stable income were no longer issues for me. Now I’m actually doing something with it.

Lately I’ve had a lot of other ideas for videos and now, with fewer distractions, I’ll actually be able to complete them. Plus I managed to complete a lengthy theoretical article on recent events in Syria that should be published in the near future.

And that’s not all- an added bonus is that Twitter seems to have scrubbed my past tweets, which means it’s going to be a lot harder for someone to cherry-pick some out-of-context tweets from several years ago and try to pull a James Gunn on me (it helps that I didn’t make the kind of “jokes” that Gunn did).

Addiction is a strange phenomenon. A person can be addicted to nearly anything, and what has zero pull on one person might completely destroy another. I’ve never understand, for example, an alcoholic’s need to drink. I’ve tried some pretty hard drugs without feeling the slightest need to take them habitually. On the other hand, I struggled with nicotine addiction for years. Social media addiction may sound like some kind of trendy, made-up condition, but anything that releases dopamine can become addictive, and social media can certainly do just that.

Just as someone can become addicted to opioids when they a prescribed as a treatment, I believe my social media addiction was caused by certain aspects of expat life, which at times is very isolating. Even when I had a regular job it was usually about twenty hours a week, leaving a lot of free time. Starting with Facebook, social media was a vital tool to keep in touch with friends and family in the English-speaking world, and that has added value when you’re living in a place where expressing yourself in your native language isn’t always possible on a daily basis.

I think like a lot of people I came to see Facebook as basically only useful as a rolodex to keep in touch with contacts, and I was gravitating away from the platform when, in December 2014, I got on the Hellsite, i.e. Twitter. In the beginning it made sense; people were just starting to pay attention to Russia Without BS and I was getting work in journalism for it. It was great for networking, and I certainly derived some benefits from it, but the rapid feedback and frenetic nature of the site clicked with my brain in ways that I knew were not exactly healthy.

Twitter can seem like a creative outlet but in reality it’s just a crutch for doing actual work. The only people I can think of directly making money off of Twitter are grifters using premium private Twitter accounts like John Schindler or Eric Garland. If you look at where the money is when it comes to content, it’s in videos, vlogging, podcasting, and yes, even articles. Even where monetization via ads is difficult or impossible, Patreon can make these things profitable. Sure, I may have got a few patrons out of Twitter, but there was no chance of attracting masses of patrons just for tweeting every day. I’m happy that my jokes seemed to have brought joy to a lot of people, but in the back of my mind I knew that this was distracting from so much more.

I might also add that Twitter is definitely a crutch for comedy. It’s simply too easy to rattle off jokes in reaction to other tweets. Sure, they may make a lot of people laugh, but that doesn’t make you a comedian and it won’t lead to acting or writing jobs. Killing it on Twitter is like being funny among your close friends and acquaintances; to some people it just comes naturally. Real comedy takes thought; a lot of work goes into it. I naturally get all kinds of funny ideas every day, and there was a time when some of those would stick and I would go home and write a post on here about it. But a shitpost on Twitter would get a massive rapid reaction, making it feel more rewarding.

That’s not to say that Twitter was responsible for the decay of this blog. A lot of that had to do with my rapid, unplanned return to the States, my relocation across the country after that, my extremely strict fitness/martial arts regimen, researching ways to help Ukraine from overseas, and finally, this year, my general fatigue for Ukraine and Russia-related issues. By the same token, however, I cannot pretend that what little free time I had was often being eaten up by posting. If you add it up, it was still a lot of time and energy spent dunking on people who are often incredibly easy targets anyway. And I knew it was a problem. One reason I never installed the app on my phone is because I didn’t want notifications from social media annoying me all day. I tend to read a lot on my phone and I never would have read as much as I do had I been getting notifications popping up every few minutes, if not seconds.

I would advise anyone else starting to work in a creative field to be mindful of how you’re using social media. These days much of your work requires you to be at your computer with an internet connection, which means you’re often forced to work with a lot of potential distractions. There was a time for me when Twitter was something I just used to promote posts on this blog; then posting on Twitter became an end in itself. Twitter personality is not a career, period (okay Dril, maybe). I would also encourage anyone reading this who has had similar problems with social media, Twitter or otherwise to feel free to share their experience in the comments. You may help others or get help for yourself.

I realize that as I complete these new projects of mine, eventually it will become necessary to return to the Hellsite (Sorry, Jack, but there’s nothing you can do) in order to promote some of them. But the key word there is complete- I do not plan to return until I have a new body of work to promote, and all activity will be restricted to such promotion. Otherwise, that tab stays closed. Of course in the mean time any fans on Twitter are welcome to share and promote any videos they enjoy on the Youtube channel or this blog post for that matter, and I would greatly appreciate it. But I’m not starting a new account until I have real content to post. Till then, people can reach me through the contact info in the about section of this site.

Perhaps the funniest thing about all this is that it was quite possibly thanks to a pro-Kremlin troll that I was freed from something that had been holding my career back for years. And I will actually be able to benefit financially from this development, especially if that screenplay gets optioned or, inshallah, sold. I guess I should say to them, spasiba, suckers!

 

 

7 thoughts on “FREE AT LAST!

  1. Impraxical

    Leaving Twitter for an extended period of time has allowed me to read more socialist and anarchist theory… so in some way, leaving Twitter has actually made me a better radical.

    Reply
    1. Impraxical

      Good on you for getting out, by the way, even if it wasn’t your choice. Looking forward to whatever you work on next.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s