Are you an American Russophile? Diagnose yourself with this quiz!

Section I: Personal Data

Are you of Russian descent? 

A. No.  5 POINTS

B. Yes, but raised my whole life in America and never lived in Russia for any significant amount of time.  1 POINT

What is your ethnic background?

A. Mostly Irish/Western European, but my great grandfather was half Polish! 1 POINT

B. Same as above, but it was my great-great-grandfather and he was Slovakian!  2 POINTS

C. My great-great-great-grandfather lived in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which had a lot of Slavs in it. I’M PRACTICALLY RUSSIAN!  50 POINTS

How much time have you spent in Russia?

Subtract one point for every year you have spent in Russia. If you haven’t spent more than two weeks in Russia, give yourself 30 points. If you have never even been to Russia at all, give yourself 50 points.

Do you speak Russian? 

A. No.  10 POINTS

B. Yes, with a horrible accent that makes Russians and non-Russians cringe when you speak, even if they agree with you. 5 POINTS

My political beliefs could best be described as:

A. Far right  5 Points

B. Far left since I started college last year. 4 POINTS

C. Extremely Malleable. 6 POINTS

D. Whatever I read on Infowars. 10 POINTS

E. All of the above.  1,000,000 POINTS

Past sexual experience 

A. Virgin 15 POINTS

B. Prostitutes only 20 POINTS

C. I’m telling you, Olga does want to get married! It’s just that we only met that one summer when I came to Moscow and showered her with gifts and took her to all kinds of expensive restaurants. We still talk on Skype and she says maybe she’ll make a decision when I come next summer! She’s totally in love with me. We’ve been chatting online for like, more than a year now! She actually kissed me goodbye at the airport!  30 POINTS

D. A and C 50 POINTS

E. D, but it doesn’t matter because I’m not interested in spoiled, materialistic Western sluts! Olga will appreciate me for who I am!

Section II: Multiple Choice Questions

You see an article with negative news about Russia, how do you react in the comment section of the article? 

A. Point out similar examples of the same problems in other countries, and insist that it’s all the same. 3 POINTS

B. Understand that if they never reported anything negative about Russia, journalists literally wouldn’t be able to cover that country, and there is no reason why they shouldn’t do that. Besides, it’s not like every article about other countries’ problems contains references to those of Russia, right? No need to get upset or leave a comment at all, for that matter.  -10 POINTS

C. Same as A, but accuse the author of being a shill for the CIA and start rambling about Iraq. 10 POINTS

D. Same as C, but with an additional rant about the Federal Reserve and “worthless fiat currency.”

You are confronted with undeniable evidence of an egregious problem in Russia which you know does not occur with any frequency in your own country. How do you respond?

A. Blame the problem on America. 10 POINTS

B. Blame the problem on the “International Bankers”(Wink, wink).  15 POINTS

C. Lie and say that this problem occurs all the time in your city. Hopefully your opponent has never been to America. 20 POINTS

D. All of the above, plus a rant about the global hegemony and the Federal Reserve. 100 POINTS

How mysterious and enigmatic are Russia and the Russian soul?

A. Very. 1 POINT

B. Terribly mysterious!  5 POINTS

C. No degenerate, soulless Westerner could ever truly comprehend the deep, enigmatic mystery that is the Russian soul, for it is like a riddle wrapped in a question, folded into a conundrum, duct-taped to a quandary, and stuffed into the rectum of a puzzle. Except for me, of course. I totally get it.  100 POINTS

You identify as radical left, but another leftist has pointed out how Russia’s government promotes far right ideas, and that it has ties to far right and fascist parties in various European countries. How do you justify this? 

A. Say that this doesn’t matter because Russia stands against “Western hegemony.”  5 POINTS

B.  Accuse your opponent of being a fascist 10 POINTS

C. A and B. 20 POINTS

You start lecturing someone in an online discussion about life in Russia, in spite of the fact that you don’t speak the language and you’ve never been there. Suddenly your opponent reveals that they actually live in Russia(or maybe they are Russian). They’re dropping all these sources backing up their claims, but they’re all in Russian so you can’t read them.  What do you do? 

A. By no means admit that you might not know what you’re talking about. Double down on your claims and pretend like nobody else is watching this exchange, or that they can easily compare your knowledge to that of your opponent and quickly realize that you’re full of shit.  10 POINTS

B. Accuse your opponent of being a CIA shill.  20 POINTS

C. Go into a meltdown about the NSA, Iraq, global hegemony, fiat currency, neoconservatives and Detroit,  AKA “The Robert Bridge.”  50 POINTS

D. All of the above. 100 POINTS

Someone calls Russia a dictatorship. How can you prove that it isn’t a dictatorship?

A. Russia has different newspapers! Some of them are critical of the government! 10 POINTS

B. I heard some Russians make a joke about Putin online! Could you do that in a dictatorship? 10 POINTS

C. America’s the country that doesn’t have freedom of speech! (Either no explanation follows, or examples which show poor understanding of the 1st Amendment are cited.)  20 POINTS

The Russian government moves to ban or heavily restrict one of those “critical” media outlets you used to show how free Russia is.  How do you respond?

A. You don’t understand. Russia is in an information war. That wasn’t an ordinary media outlet, but a propaganda mill!  10 POINTS

B. Same as A, but throw in a completely inaccurate comparison to some case in the US or Europe. 20 POINTS

C. Same as A, but point out Russia’s remaining “independent” media outlets. Should any of those be banned or restricted in the same way at a later date, simply use answer A in reference to them.  30 POINTS

You’re right-wing reactionary who constantly refers to Russia as a defender of traditional values. Your opponent confronts you with video evidence which contradicts the narrative of Russia as a morally upright, traditional society. How do you react? 

A. Standard whataboutism.  10 POINTS

B. Admit the problem exists, but it’s somehow America’s fault.  20 POINTS

C. Start babbling about the 90’s even though you never visited Russia in the 90’s.  30 POINTS

D. All of the above. 50 POINTS

People keep accusing you of being a Putin-shill. What “criticisms” of Putin and/or his regime can you make without being a Western liberal Maidan/Western Hegemony/Gay fascism-supporting sack of shit?  

A. He’s too popular. 1 POINT

B. His dick is too big, making it difficult for him to wear tight pants. 5 POINTS

C. Putin’s problem is that he isn’t hard enough. He should force Russians to adhere to an official ideology. Russia would still be more free than the US in that case, however, because reasons! 50 POINTS

Section III: Matching 

Whataboutery test. Match the following criticisms about Russia(1-8) to their appropriate “what about…”(A-H)   Give yourself 2 points for every correctly matched pair.

1. Urban Decay, crumbling infrastructure

2. Massive wealth inequality

3. Tolerance and encouragement of xenophobia and far right-wing ideology

4. Massive corruption

5. Poor demographics

6. Annexation of Crimea

7. Lack of democracy

8. Police corruption

A. What about Japan?

B. What about Ferguson?

C. What about the 1%?

D. What about Detroit?

E. What about the 2000 election?

F. What about Kosovo?

G. What about Praviy Sektor?

H. What about the bailout?

Section IV: Essay Questions. 

Answer any 3 of the following questions in your own words. Try to keep them within normal comments section limits.

1. Putin has just announced new laws requiring all Russian citizens to do 5 years of unpaid labor, a total ban on the internet, and the right of “first night” for all Duma deputies and local bureaucrats. Justify this and explain how it’s actually much worse in America.  

2. You have never spent any significant time in Russia, nor can you actually speak the language. Explain how you are more knowledgeable about the subject of daily life in Russia than someone who actually does live there and who speaks the language.  

3. Write several paragraphs about post-Soviet Russia’s economic achievements, e.g. recovering from the horrible 90’s, the Yotaphone, that sleek new tram. 

4. Explain how Russia’s economic shortcomings don’t actually matter at all because unlike the degenerate West, Russia has deep spiritual values. Remember to include your rough estimate as to when the West will collapse due to its tolerance of homosexuality.  

5. Explain the mysterious Russian soul.  TRICK QUESTION! YOU CAN’T!  

6. A person with far more experience and knowledge of Russia has just told you that you’ve basically built a delusion around Russia, imagining that it is some fantasy land which conforms to your dreams because you feel so alienated by your own society yet you are unable to cope with these feelings in a normal, healthy way. They say that you are basically the equivalent of those white kids who get obsessed with Japan. They warn you that Russia does not conform to your fantasies and you should probably start reevaluating your life to find better solutions to your problems than living vicariously through a non-existent version of a distant country.  In your own words, how fucked up is that? Also, would you say your opponent is definitely a faggot?  

7. Explain all the wonderful, magical things that the BRICS alliance can do to destroy the Anglo-American Atlantic Hegemony.  For example: Satellite ion cannons, moon colony, etc.   

HOW TO CALCULATE YOUR SCORE:  

Essays will be evaluated if posted in the comments section.  For all other sections, add up your points and consult the following chart.

RUSSOPHILE SCORING CHART

0-5: You have a serious problem. Stop frequenting Voice of Russia or RT.

10: Hopeless. You probably already own a souvenir ushanka hat.

20 or more: Critical case. You could be sent to the most dilapidated Siberian village and you’d still say it’s superior to Boston. Requires long, grueling therapy.

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15 thoughts on “Are you an American Russophile? Diagnose yourself with this quiz!

  1. Braindeadanon

    #3

    In 1917, the October criminals (November according to the degenerate Western Gregorian calendar) came to power in a German-funded coup d’etat against the legitimate government of Russia. Prior to that point Russia had been an economic dynamo. There are several reasons for this: 1. Strong leadership, Alexander III and Nicholas II infused their population with spiritual values which had suffered mightily after the Western-led Atheist-Islamo-Homo crusade against Russian values during the Crimean War. This war was engineered by Karl Marx, an atheist who hated Russia for her spiritual values, and was involved in a lifelong homosexual relationship with Manchester industrialist Friedrich Engels. Today, it is widely thought that the seven children that Marx sired with Prussian aristocrat Jenny Westphalen was a mere ploy to pass as a heterosexual, so as to better act as a fifth column of homosexuality in the labor movement. Driven on by the righteousness of her cause against homosexual-atheist aggression, Russia nearly succeeded at bringing down the degenerate regimes in the West. Unfortunately, the Russian serfs, who had grown up in an hermetically sealed environment and had no experience with homosexuality, became debauched by Turkish licentiousness and faltered in battle. Soon after a group of liberal agitators in the pay of the state department began demanding the end of serfdom and stirring up the serfs against their own interests. This resulted in the terrible 60s a period of effeminacy and economic disaster for Russia. It was widely pilloried by Russian Orthodox hero Dostoevsky who predicted the triumph of degenerate Western values over healthy Russian spiritual values. However, the party could not last as the Russian people got wise to the perils of materialism. This is what occurred at the end of the 1990s as well.

    2. Free Markets-Russia at the end of the 19th century was a paradise of economic freedom and libertarianism. The ideals of libertarianism have a great deal in common with that of the Russian soul, the free market and economic freedom works in mysterious ways, it is inscrutable, dynamic, and endowed a dual nature of cool harshness and a tender supple beauty like that of a beautiful woman. In a free market, it is precisely structure that gives rise to freedom, like the authority of the tsar, the absolutism of the market gives rise to freedom of action for the common man. This was the great insight of Thomas Hobbes. Russia rejected the false materialism and democratism of the West while cultivating the flower of the free market. By the end of the Tsarist Empire, peasants could freely speculate and quote the grain prices of America and trade on the international market. Much like Russia’s 13% flat tax this freedom infused Russia with dynamism. Until the “revolutionaries” came along infused with Western hatred for Russian values. Some Western liberals and commies compare Russian colonization of Central Asia under the Tsars to the Belgian Congo, but that’s not true at all! What about the lynchings in America at the same time?!!!!

    3. State Intervention- Just like Russia today, Tsarist Russia mixed the right about of state intervention with the right amount of market. Most of the workers in Russia worked for state operated factories. Similar to how the state oil companies care and subsidize Russian citizens today. It was a perfect system, much better than decadent Western welfare states arising at the same time. Everything was fine until the Bolshies came along and ruined it.

    Modern Russia has obviously been through some troubles. Like the drunken liberal Yeltsin and Stalin’s terrors. For instance in Stalin’s Russia industry grew at between 10-14% a year. Last year the economy grew at 1.4% a year. Take that communism! There were some okay things about Stalin because he was a strong leader but overall communism is very naughty and literal genocide against Christian whites. To refute communism let’s compare % shares of global GDP, in 1950 Stalin’s Russia made up 10% of global GDP. Today Modern Russia makes up about 3% of global GDP. As you can see the theory of communism is obviously quite exploded and only return to Russia’s spiritual values can save Russia. Right now, Russia is going through some difficulties due to a US conspiracy to keep oil prices low and the fact that non-Russians resent Russia’s legitimate claims to sacred lands in other peoples countries like Crimea. Those lands are merely on-loan from Russia despite the fact that they legitimately seceded through the processes established by Lenin and Stalin. That’s why another reason communism is bad! It’s dividing Great Russia and her peoples! Anyway, the Americans bribed the saudis to raise the saudis and ruin their domestic oil industry, no doubt about that. The state department has unlimited control over oil prices and can bend them to their will, that’s why American politicians always run on the platform of lowering them when they are high. We just need to look for other sources of innovation, for instance did you know the used cloth and foam rolling industry is exploding? If we combine markets, flat taxes, strident nationalism and Russian soul to pursuing the market shares in these industries we could overtake the United States by 2016 and the entire EU by 2018.

    Reply
  2. Braindeadanon

    Try it, I don’t think he would ever tell anyone who he really is, unless you could somehow pry it out of him.

    One time I think I saw him fuck up and publish an article under his own name at globalresearch.ca I tried to see if I could find the article in question but there are now 800 Ukraine articles to look through. Who even knows if its still up. I tried deep googling but couldn’t find anything by his own admission he said his anonymity is “thin” and easy to discover if you know where to look.

    He claims to be the son of Russian emigres and that his family was killed and/or gulaged by Stalin. Also claims to be an “ex”-spook for NATO. Claims he was an observer for the UN during the yugoslav wars, also claims that he became alienated from the West because of alleged mistreatment of the serbs. Lives in Florida and has kids who are apparently teenagers.

    Reply
    1. Big Bill Haywood Post author

      I’d be willing to bet that a lot of that story is bullshit. He refers to himself as a “legal” immigrant. I’m just wondering why he prefers to live in Sodom and Gomorrah when a man of his means can surely find work in the Holy Russian Empire.

      Of course I use pen names too, but that’s because we don’t have actual freedom of speech here and I’m not a citizen. Not that citizens have many more rights compared to me.

      I really value privacy so I’m not necessarily concerned that Mr. Saker tries to remain somewhat anonymous, it’s just that he makes such bold claims.

      Speaking of which, what’s the deal with Russophiles and Serbia? That’s what got Kirby and Sleboda started down that road, and I could probably say the same for myself.

      Yes, 1999 was an egregious act by NATO, and the Yugoslav wars as a whole were greatly mishandled and boiled down to bad guys(Serbs) and good guys(everyone else). But for fuck’s sake it’s 2014. Even the Serbs apparently think that way because they’re on their way to the European Union and quite possibly NATO. They probably realize the value of this now because being on friendly terms with those alliances means never having to worry about Vojvodina or the Sandzak. In fact Hungary being in NATO is probably what ensured the safety of the former.

      I also find it funny how Russia fucked Serbia on the South Stream gas pipeline, stupidly thinking that they can blame this on the EU. I guarantee you Bulgaria and Serbia aren’t going to see it that way. Russians always think that they share some deep connection with Serbia when in fact culturally and linguistically they don’t. Yes, Serbs are Orthodox. So are Romanians and Ethiopians. Point? Serbian culture is radically different from that of Muscovite Russia.

      Reply
      1. Asehpe

        Still Putin enjoys quite a following in Serbia. Is this to be explained solely by Russia’s stance on Kosovo? (I remember, curiously, having talked to Russians before the Yugoslav wars, and even then there was sympathy for Serbs, but not for Croats — damn Catholics! –, Bosniaks (all muslims!), and especially not Albanians. The Serbs were likened by a friend of mine to a pastoral people with ‘passion’, ‘fire’ and ‘strength’. Isn’t there something older and deeper at play here?

      2. Jim Kovpak Post author

        Historically Russia was a friend of Serbia because it was leverage against the Ottoman Empire and it had access to the Adriatic(via its long-time brother state Montenegro). This has often been portrayed as some kind of sacred bond, but it is nothing but old imperial propaganda being rehashed.

        One thing everybody forgets about(assuming they ever read it in the first place), is how Russia dicked over the Serbs in 1908. Sergei Witte wanted Austria to support Russia’s bid to revise a treaty that would give her warships access through the Bosphorus. In exchange, he said Austria could formally annex Bosnia and Herzegovina, which up till that point was considered occupied Ottoman territory. The Austrians took his advice, but then didn’t deliver on Witte’s request.

        The Serbs had been hoping that once Austrian occupation ended, Bosnia and Herzegovina would fall into their hands as the Ottoman Empire was increasingly weakening and it was pretty much cut off from that territory. With Austria’s formal annexation, they knew that wouldn’t happen. They protested to their patron, Russia, but Russia couldn’t say anything because when they brought this up with the Austrians, the latter said they could just publish the negotiations which would prove that Russia sold the Serbs out.

        The next time Serbia ran into trouble, Russia stood to lose all credibility if it backed down. This came to pass in 1914, and the rest is history.

  3. Big Bill Haywood Post author

    I’m not necessarily interested in the guy’s actual name, but at least a little more info on who he is and what credentials he has. Unlike me, this guy makes some pretty big claims. If you’re going to do that to establish some kind of authority, you do have a certain burden of proof.

    In my case the most extraordinary thing I’m claiming isn’t really that extraordinary at all. If it ever came down to it and I were challenged for proof by someone who mattered(like an employer), I could just show them all the visas in my passport, explaining the 2006-roughly 2008 gap by the fact that work visas in that period were green sheets of paper as opposed to stickers taking up a full page in your passport. Anyone with experience in Russia can casually browse and confirm my basic story. For example- When do you hear anything about Jaguar and Russia on RT or any Russia-themed site, aside from maybe on VK or Lurkmore.to? Why would you even know about those sites if you didn’t at least spend some significant time in Russia and were familiar with the language.

    By contrast we have a guy claiming to have been an ex-NATO spy, military adviser, or whatever the fuck, and he is obviously trying to use that as backup of his political claims.

    Reply
  4. braindeadanon

    Probably right on his life story. In my experience, it’s usually hacks and charlatans who are the greatest credential mongers. Much of his schtick seems to be “believe me I’m an ‘ex’-spook” but the blog seems to be rather short on evidence and long on bizarre rants about theology, bible verses and Putin quotes.

    His page seems to exemplify the odd tendency of Russian nationalist and Russophile pages to combine allegedly anti-Nazi rhetoric with Nazi ideology. For instance he can’t help but make written ejaculations about “Judeo-Bolsheviks” “Trotskyite Genocide” and his all time favorite boogyman: “the Anglo-Zionists”. The latter reminds me of Nazi claims that the Jews were not only behind capitalist Britain and America but the USSR as well. He seems to screen outright Nazi trolls while claims there’s such a thing as “intelligent revisionism” regarding the holocaust; in the latter article I sent you he uses the term holocaust in quotation marks. I just don’t understand these Russian nationalists, if the communists were so evil and the holocaust was exaggerated or a big hoax, then why does the Soviet victory in WWII even matter? If you think that, why not go full Nazi and declare that the bad guys won WWII? At least you’d be intellectually consistent.

    On Serbia, I really don’t know, but I confess I really got into it for a while. I hate to say it but honestly Yugoslavia was a tea party compared to the Gulf Wars and the genocide-sanctions Iraq suffered through. On the handling of Milosevic at the Hague, compared with the trial of Saddam Hussein the court seems positively friendly and competent. And honestly, according to some estimates the Chechen war may have been just as violent as the Yugoslav wars and neither the West or the Russian establishment has called anyone to account. Which actually indicates that Russia is still privileged in the current global system, I couldn’t see a country like say Zimbabwe having such a large civil war without the West calling ‘genocide’ applying sanctions and invading to institute regime change.

    The way they act reminds me of how the Soviets under Kruschev and Breznev connived to break apart the European Common Market but actually ended up marking it much stronger. It even ended up getting nominal support from Maoist China at a time where most of the world and Europe could’ve cared less about the common market. If anyone ends up saving the EU it will be Putin.

    Isn’t it hilarious that the gas is getting rerouted to Turkey which is a NATO ally, a former EU applicant, a liberal democracy (with gay rights parades) and America’s second closest ally in the Middle East? Putin is touting his dalliance with Erdogan as some kind of charm offensive/pivot against the West. I think its funny though, Turkey is actually an industrializing country whereas Russia was at one time considered a developed nation and a superpower and has collapsed into the category of a ‘developing’ nation.

    Villain though he is, Erdogan made some noise about Palestine since the Israelis went commando mode on the Gaza flotilla. Putin betrayed the Iraqis, the Afghanis and the Libyans in their wars against America. I think Putin’s pivot towards the Middle East will end in ignominious failure.

    Reply
    1. Big Bill Haywood Post author

      Hey it’s all cool because he engages in “Anti-fascist Holocaust denial!” Actually to be sure, while all the things you told me speak to his extreme stupidity, none of it particularly shocks or surprises me. Blaming Trotsky for the purges is a good example of the modern Russian view of Soviet history. Essentially, it is the same as the Trotskyite narrative, except they praise Stalin instead of condemning him based on it.

      Getting back to Kosovo, I too was deeply impacted by it because it hit me right at that political coming of age moment when I was 16. It also occurred almost immediately after I first returned from Russia.

      The main problem with Kosovo is that it was an offensive war based on a lie(see the Ramboulliet Appendix B), and rather than prevent ethnic cleansing it only enabled it. But over a decade later and with Kosova independent, Serbia has moved forward.

      I think a big problem with the Western left is that they cling to things like this because they can’t understand that there is no “other side,” no other camp. NATO won. Any serious revolutionary would be dedicated to figuring out how to win power in NATO countries and eventually in the whole alliance. In other words- defeat it from the inside. Backing Russia is betting on a losing horse.

      Reply
  5. braindeadanon

    In Yugoslavia the proletariat really didn’t have anything to gain from nationalist in-fighting and so the best thing that could happen is for the war to end. I suppose US violation of Serbian sovereignty did concern the proletariat of that country. However, I don’t see how it really concerns Russia or the international proletariat that much tbh.

    Coming to power in a core imperialist country is quite a feat, it was only done once in the last century and that was through the Soviet overthrow of Nazi Germany. We probably had some missed chances like Portugal in 1974 most realistically and arguably France in 68. Historically the world proletariat has never been strong enough to take on all the imperialists and once, usually we do best when they fallout amongst themselves. I think the facts are the proletariat still has something to gain (or at least something to lose) with liberal globalization, and I don’t think we can lend ourselves to Putin’s assault on that order in pursuit of the restoration of the Russian Empire. Russian imperialism may have to die first to change the global balance of forces against against imperialism as a whole. If the Russian proletariat keeps allowing itself to be used for empire then we could all be in a really bad way.

    Reply
    1. Big Bill Haywood Post author

      As difficult as it may seem, any successful revolution would need to start in a modern, successful country. Developing nations are too easy to isolate and invade. A particular leftist, who sadly drank the Donbass Kool-Aid recently, had an interesting idea- Communist organizing at the EU level. The right is trying to do it- might as well fight them there. Maidan also proved that massive protest movements that keep the pressure on can be successful without too much violence. Industrialized nations also tend to be the ones where police aren’t likely to open up with machine guns or snipers on a crowd of protesters. The trick is organizing those protesters to put constant pressure on the leadership and not to stop at petty reforms.

      Let me make clear that this is not at all an endorsement of revolution via the ballot box. We’re talking about mass protests, strikes, etc. All weapons must be available to the people.

      Reply
      1. Braindeadanon

        That’s an interesting idea, since the parliamentary supra-national structures are there. The size of Europe certainly isn’t the issue as communists in Russia, America, and China organize in larger countries. The bigger issue is the fact that Europe is a coalition of nations with different cultures and at different stages of development rather than a single nation. It’s true that Europe is becoming more economically uniform and culturally homogenous than it was in say the days of the 2nd international.I tend to think the internationals and comintern were scrapped for a reason, but if there is a right-wing international I don’t see why we shouldn’t form a left-wing one.

        Maidan was somewhat different, from what I can see the conditions in Ukraine are probably closer to a Third World nation like Mexico than to the US or Germany. Professional revolutionaries could also likely be doing much better if we had that five billion dollars that Nuland was talking about. Now would be the time to get some sugar daddy funds from those “communist billionaires” the far-right is always talking about. Given that Fred Koch got rich from tech he sold to the Soviet Union, maybe they are secret communists pretending to be right wing lol

        If you remember the lessons from the Paris Commune and the attempted German socialist revolution in 1919, its pretty clear that the bourgeois state in a developed country will not hesitate to use deaths squads or mass murder if things get to the point of revolution. From what I can tell India has the world’s strongest revolutionary communist movement and I think if any imperialist country falls it will be India.

        (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJc1vXFdB7g)

  6. Big Bill Haywood Post author

    Ukraine certainly wasn’t Germany, but it depending on where you visit it is a pretty advanced country. The problem with Yanukovych and the Customs’ Union was that this was seen as something holding back further development. This is because of the way Russia itself is. All power is consolidated in the hands of a few people, and then you’ve got the hierarchy of bureaucrats and state workers all the way down, taking their cuts on the way. While Russia has all kinds of innovative people but the power structure is afraid of anybody getting rich who isn’t under Putin’s thumb. It’s a hardcore consumerist, capitalist state trying to keep capitalism in check- a losing combination for sure.

    In terms of funding for revolutionary parties, I think the most important thing to start with is party discipline and dues. Parties in Turkey have done amazing things just because their members all pay their dues. Also it may be possible to get NGO money by forming front organizations which join coalitions. Since the EU and US obviously don’t give a fuck if hard-right nationalists get involved in their protest movements, they’re obviously not scrutinizing every group in these “civil society” coalitions.

    Reply

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